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UFT elections: another look at New Action and MORE votes

May 5, 2013 am31 10:32 am

We’ve already seen that votes flipped to New Action from ICE/TJC in 2010, and back to MORE in 2013.

But has the overall non-Unity vote changed? I’m hardly the first to draw this conclusion. It has changed, but not much.

Let’s start with the raw numbers:

Year ELEM MS/JHS/IS High School Functional Retirees
NAC I/T/M NAC I/T/M NAC I/T/M NAC I/T/M NAC I/T/M
2004 556 1,239 311 422 700 1,417 512 990 1,558 872
2007 562 1,337 273 444 521 1,524 548 1,032 1,616 1,061
2010 978 703 421 248 774 1,369 1,175 708 2,234 1,037
2013 534 1,140 161 398 452 1,430 754 951 1,880 1,490

Let’s examine non-Unity votes taken as a single unit:

Year ELEM MS/JHS/IS High School Functional Retirees
2004 1,795 733 2,117 1,502 2,430
2007 1,899 717 2,045 1,580 2,677
2010 1,681 669 2,143 1,883 3,271
2013 1,674 559 1,882 1,705 3,370

It might be hard to absorb from a table how uninteresting these numbers are. Try a graph:

non-Unity vote

The overall flatness is quite apparent. But there are some exceptions. The total number of retirees voting for a caucus other than Unity has increased in absolute terms. Both New Action and the other group(s) have benefited. A second shift, small, and hard to see in the noise, New Action has a small but real increase in votes among functional, leaving that line slightly higher. And the seeming dip in middle school? Illusion, as voters in 6-12 and K-8 schools vote in the other divisions, and there are more such schools today.

Remember, these flat lines are in the context of falling turnout, falling absolute numbers of total votes. The next post on this topic will look more closely at that context, and offer some analysis.

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