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LSO derby – elementary schools

May 27, 2007 pm31 8:36 pm

Yesterday I posted the LSO results for high schools. Today? Elementary schools. (Totals for all schools are here). Patrick suggested that separating the levels was important, and so I am trying to do that.

Most elementary schools are called PSxxx where those x’s are numbers. For named schools, I went by the name as best I could, then the codes based on the old districts (10×008 is PS8, Bronx in old District 10) assuming 0xx’s and 1xx’s were elementary. I know, plenty wrong. But mostly right.

Few elementary schools chose PSOs (some were MS/HS only). Empowerment numbers are under 30%, (vs 44% among high schools). Proportionately far more elementary schools than high schools chose LSO’s: 66% vs. 36%. By borough: Bronx – 47% elem, 26% hs; Man – 57% elem, 33% hs; Bklyn – 69% elem, 38% hs; Qns – 85% elem, 59% hs; SI – 62% elem, 22% hs.

One LSO, Judith Chin’s “Integrated Curriculum,” did especially well at the elementary level. Chin was first at the high school level (15%, vs 12%, 6% and 4% for the others) but at the elementary level a whopping 36% of schools signed on with her, including 70% in Queens, 60% in Staten Island, and 33% in Manhattan, where she once worked.

(Detailed numbers are beneath the fold —>)

 
Bronx

Manhattan

Brooklyn

Queens

Staten Island

Total

Chin

24

37

48

124

25

258

Lyles

2

12

74

2

0

90

Rodriguez

45

12

0

0

0

57

Cashin

0

2

36

24

1

63

New Visions

0

2

2

0

0

4

Fordham

0

2

1

1

0

4

Center for Ed Innovation

12

2

0

1

10

25

Empowerment

69

42

69

25

6

211

Borough Totals

152

111

230

177

42

712

Here are the numbers by type of support organization:

  LSO PSO emp Total
Bronx 71 12 69 152
Manhattan 63 6 42 111
Brooklyn 158 3 69 230
Queens 150 2 25 177
Staten Island 26 10 6 42
Total 468 33 211 712
2 Comments leave one →
  1. May 28, 2007 am31 7:42 am 7:42 am

    It was great of you to look into these decisions. At the elementary level it looks like principals went with what they considered to be the safest option. Chin was very popular but it doesn’t make sense that she now supports 258 elementary/middle schools and another 59 high schools. I would be concerned about whether she can put the support organization together in time. And what happens when schools are not happy with what they get?

  2. May 28, 2007 am31 8:08 am 8:08 am

    I haven’t counted middle schools yet.

    And Chin becomes the de facto Board of Education super-region. What did you do when your district fell short?

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