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A few geometry games worth playing

November 16, 2008 am30 4:01 am

The eyeball game has reached me through a few e-mails and blogs…

The taxicab pearl search game called Shinju got courtesy of Ξ at 360.

Then there’s planarity, which I linked long ago.

Which is most addictive? (The correct answer is either “none” or silence)

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10 Comments leave one →
  1. November 16, 2008 am30 5:59 am 5:59 am

    Planarity is awesome and horribly, horribly addicting. The eyeball game is pretty cool but not as dangerous to my work habits.

  2. November 16, 2008 am30 6:22 am 6:22 am

    eyeball is the most addictive. Probably since I am super competitive, and want the best score.

  3. November 16, 2008 am30 6:30 am 6:30 am

    I do better with the mouse at work (need a fresh pad at home). Here I am lucky to get under 4.

    Susan, I agree, except… there’s a “cheat” – I’ll let you know, if you really want it, but it kind of spoils some of the adventure. But even after you know it, it is still fun to execute.

  4. Rachel permalink
    November 16, 2008 am30 8:21 am 8:21 am

    I just tried eyeball — I don’t think its going to be as dangerous as planarity. I’ve gotten planarity pretty systematized now, but its still good for moments when its nice to be able to untangle something.

  5. Rachel permalink
    November 16, 2008 pm30 10:28 pm 10:28 pm

    Shinju’s pretty addicting too…

  6. November 17, 2008 am30 4:20 am 4:20 am

    I had seen all of those before beside planarity. I didn’t find any of them addicting. These, however….

    http://www.freewebarcade.com/game/hexiom-connect/

    http://fantasticcontraption.com/

  7. November 17, 2008 am30 6:35 am 6:35 am

    jd2718,

    Thanks for your comment on my blog. I am new to the blogging world and you are the first person to leave me a comment. I’ve been following your blog and many others for quite a while and thought I’d take the leap. So far I am finding it to be a great way to reflect on my day and put things into perspective. Any way, thanks for taking the time to leave your thoughts.

    Mrs. H

  8. November 17, 2008 am30 7:29 am 7:29 am

    Good luck to you! I hope you don’t mind, I’ve linked your blog to your signature. Plus here: Math Tales from the Spring. I figure a few readers might wander over and look at what you’ve written so far… Not a bad thing.

  9. Rachel permalink
    November 17, 2008 am30 10:34 am 10:34 am

    Re Shinju… After frittering away the day with it, I’ve figured out how to be sure of not losing. I haven’t figured out how to break 40,000 though. In other words, I can always solve it in 4 clicks, but haven’t figured out how to increase my chances of solving it in less than that.

  10. November 10, 2009 am30 1:15 am 1:15 am

    JD,

    I’ll look forward to comments/thoughts you have on teaching math through story. The site is imagineeducation.org and send you a copy of our game Ko’s Journey when it releases in January. If anything, the place of interest I see is how you feel this might apply to more complex math- can it be embedded in story too?

    -Scott

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