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Common Core Comment Period – awfully brief

March 21, 2010 pm31 6:05 pm

Issue standards for K-12 for english-social studies and mathematics. For the whole country. With strings about to be attached. And the comment period is March 10 – April 2?

That’s 3 weeks, folks. For standards that could be with us for a very long time. And for standards that will be likely difficult to revise.

Maybe they are so good that they need little comment? No such luck.

I’ve been following Tom Hoffman (Tuttle SVC). His take? No such luck. (the link is to his first post. There are at least 15. He only does reading, er literacy, er English, er, I’m not sure. You know, that stuff that’s not math.)

I saw a teacher with a comment. Kate(t). What says Kate? Some pretty big problems. Ms. Flecha had something to say. Unh oh.

Maybe there should be enough time for lots of teachers, researchers, advocates, professional organizations to read closely, and to comment. I’d certainly like to read and comment, but I don’t know (working teacher and all) if I will have time in the next 10 days. And maybe there should be time for redrafting, and a second round of comments?  Not likely.

Why do I think we are about to get steamrolled?

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6 Comments leave one →
  1. March 21, 2010 pm31 7:19 pm 7:19 pm

    And it is not as if history tells us that reforms pushed through under the radar will stick.

    • March 21, 2010 pm31 8:38 pm 8:38 pm

      Ok, so here’s a sideline question (strange for me, because I don’t intend to be on the sideline):

      How would these things affect states with strongly written standards or curricula? Would this trump California and Texas? New York?

      (Yuck. I asked a practical implementation question about something I’d like to see obliterated. But I am kind of curious)

      • March 22, 2010 pm31 1:56 pm 1:56 pm

        In terms of RttT, and perhaps whatever is in NCLB 2.0, states are expected to adopt the Common Core as at least “85%” of their standards in the relevant subject areas. So for states that go along with this, yes, it trumps.

  2. March 21, 2010 pm31 9:10 pm 9:10 pm

    No word from NYSED on 1. what will be tested and 2. what will be required for graduation. Kinda important.

  3. March 25, 2010 pm31 5:21 pm 5:21 pm

    Meh, these are minor changes compared to what’s needed:
    – Re-integrate learning and work (neo-apprenticeship)
    – Make current algebra, geometry and each major hard science into AT LEAST a four-year course
    – Start algebra at preschool (NOT current algebra, a different one)
    – Introduce programming from preschool and up, and integrate all math courses with programming

    • March 29, 2010 pm31 2:25 pm 2:25 pm

      Programming? That’s not an idea I’ve heard before.

      Algebra and Geometry as concurrent 4 year courses? That’s a lot of time in the week, unless they were not 45 minutes, 5 days.

      But Physics and Chemistry, too? I am having trouble understanding what your proposed school day would look like.

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